Visit the Course Catalog for the official course description and listing

101: MUSIC, Culture, Context

This course explores our globalized musical present and the major forces (social, political, economic, technological) that have shaped it over the last few centuries. Attention is focused on music-making as a form of human activity within and between cultures. Course content ranges over music of diverse times and places. No prior experience in music is needed.  Professor Torres

102: Music in Western Civilization

The focus of this course is the development of music in the civilizations of Europe and America, not only as an art with its own history, but also as a mirror of the artistic, social, political, and economic development of the Western world. Students are introduced to a basic repertoire in classical music. No prerequisites.  Professor Torres / Professor Cummings.

103: Introduction to World Music Traditions

An exploration of the history, styles, and performance practices of music of African, Asian, and Indian cultures. The study of music in the context of cultural traditions and institutions, and its influence on the music of Europe and America, encourages students to examine music from a cross-cultural perspective and to experience the music through performance. Offered each semester. No prerequisite. Professor Stockton.

104: Music Technology 1

This course explores the use of computers to compose music in a digital format through sequencing and sampling software. The basics of melody, rhythm, and harmony will be examined as they relate to computer-assisted music composition. Weekly assignments engage students in exploring specific techniques and features of digital audio software. The final capstone project involves utilizing all skills developed in the course to compose a multi-track musical composition in a variety of audio file formats. No prerequisite. Staff.

121: Music Theory I

This introductory course in music theory begins with a review of elemental concepts including pitch and rhythm notation, intervals, scales, and triads. The primary focus will then be on a study of the “Common Practice Period,” encompassing diatonic harmonic practices since the 19th century, with correlated sight singing, ear training, and keyboard assignments. One-hour laboratory session arranged. No prerequisites.  Professor Wilkins.

130: Beginning Class Piano

This course is intended for those students who wish to begin study of the piano, particularly those with limited or no music reading skills. The class of five or six beginning piano students meets 50 minutes twice a week for 12 weeks. Music reading in both treble and bass clefs, as well as basic piano techniques such as scales, hand position, and other technical concepts are taught. ¼ course. Ms. Fisher.

150-161: Ensemble Performance

Active participation in an approved musical ensemble. Regular attendance at rehearsals and all performances in addition to other requirements as deemed necessary. ¼ course designation. Credits may be combined up to the equivalent of two courses to satisfy Humanities elective requirements.  Staff.

Current Credit Ensembles:

Choir (Mus 150)

Jazz Ensemble (Mus 151)

Chamber Music Ensembles (Mus 152)

Orchestra (Mus 153)

Concert Band (Mus 154)

Jazz Combo (Mus 155)

Percussion Ensemble (Mus 158)

Chamber Singers (Mus 160)

Early Music Ensemble (Mus 161)

Current Non-credit Ensembles:

Pep Band and Brass Ensemble

201: Music History & Literature: 1600-1915

This course surveys the music of the Western “cultivated” tradition (the “Baroque,” “Classical,” and “Romantic” periods).  The repertoire is presented through lectures, discussion, readings, and sound recordings.  Emphasis is on an analysis of and engagement with actual music compositions representative of the principal stylistic developments characteristic of each of the three major style periods.
Prerequisites: Music 121 or permission of instructor

202: Music History & Literature: 1915-Present

This course examines music since 1915 through extensive listening.  Course content includes a survey of Western art music as well as examples of blues, jazz, musical theater, rock, and non-Western music.  The repertoire is presented through a study of readings, sound recordings, films, and lectures. Students encounter the communities, histories, traditions, and newer forms of expression of music since the early decades of the 20th century. Professor Cummings, Professor Torres.
Prerequisites: Music 121 or permission of instructor

204: Music Technology II

This course is designed to further develop skills and applications of technology as introduced in Music 104. It explores music composition, arranging, and digital audio editing using advanced computer hardware and software. The course is projects-based, using software applications that focus on digital music sequencing, editing, and notation.
Prerequisite: MUS 104

222: Music Theory II

This course continues the study of advanced diatonic harmonic practices with correlated sight singing, ear training, and keyboard assignments.  Concepts covered will include: inverted triads in four-part harmony, harmonic cadences, dominant seventh chords in four-part harmony, non-harmonic tones, jazz extended chords, improvisation, and exercises in basic form and analysis. One-hour laboratory session arranged.
Prerequisite: Music 121 or permission of instructor

224: Jazz Improvisation

This course is designed for students who have strong interests in jazz improvisation and performance. Students will expand their historical knowledge and listening skills, study jazz harmony in detail, analyze song forms and chord structures, enhance keyboard skills, learn to sing improvised solos, transcribe and perform solos from recordings, and perform regularly in class. Students will develop specialized musicianship skills with many assignments being individualized and project-based.
Prerequisites: Music 222 or permission of instructor

231: The Musical Culture of japan

This course will introduce the principal musical traditions of Japan from ancient court music (Gagaku) to contemporary genres. Integrated readings and discussions of social institutions, religious practice, and historically rigid class hierarchies will inform the musical explorations. Through guided listening and performing exercises we will explore Shinto and Buddhist rituals, important theater traditions (Noh and Kabuki), classical instrumental forms (koto, shamisen, shakuhachi), and various folk-related genres. Professor Stockton H, GM2
Prerequisites: Music 103 or permission of instructor

233: THE MUSIC of West Africa

This course will explore the diversity of musical expression and related cultural traditions found in selected regions of West Africa. Examination, analysis, and performance of ritual and ceremonial-based musical genres and investigations of related cultural practices will form the core of study that will also incorporate comparative readings in African history, religions, geography, and indigenous customs. The course will also incorporate the broader topics of the scholarly representation of African music, the role of music in African social life, and the impact of colonialism and globalization.  Professor Stockton: H, GM2
Prerequisites: Music 103 or permission of instructor

231-39: Selected Studies in World Music

The goal of these courses is to explore the indigenous music of selected cultures and regions independent of Western “common practice.”  Through guided listening, performance activities, and cultural analysis students will experience both the aural landscape and the larger phenomenon of how music functions within culture. Possible topics include the musical culture of a region (e.g., Africa, Asia, Latin America) or a country (e.g., Japan, China, India). Descriptions are available through the Department of Music office and the Registrar.
Prerequisite: Music 103 or permission of instructor

240: Women in Music

This course will examine outstanding musical achievements of women throughout history and in contemporary society. Women’s global contribution to music will be explored through diverse styles of composition and performance, active participation in education, and patronage. Topics include music and power, gender, class, challenging the “roles,” and performing identities. In an active classroom environment, students will have ample challenge to lead and discover their own contribution to the arts through valid argument. Professor Kelly.
Prerequisite: A music course, a “Women’s Studies” course, or permission of instructor

251-259: Selected Studies in Music Theory and Analysis

Courses taught under this title focus on an area of music theory, analysis, or composition. Possible topics include the theoretical concepts that underlie an era of “school” (e.g., the “New Viennese School”), a theoretical/compositional discipline such as 18th century counterpoint, or a special aspect of analysis such as Form and Structure in Music.  Descriptions of current offerings are available through the department office and the Registrar’s Office.

Mus 255/Neur 255: Music & the Brain: Neuroscience of Music

An increasing amount of scientific research is indicating that the benefits of music training extend to the brain. For example, recent studies suggest that it boosts brain circuitry and increases certain cognitive functions. Further insights into how music training affects the brain may lead to new education methods and new ways to treat brain damage. In “Neuroscience of Music,” we will examine the connection between science and the arts.  In this course, you will work with students from a variety of disciplines and backgrounds to examine a problem from multiple perspectives. Music provides a tool to study numerous aspects of neuroscience, including motor-skills, learning, memory, and emotion. Neuroscience provides an outlet to study the power of music in humanity. This course would take a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding neural systems governing music perception, performance, listening, and cognition. Professors Kelly and Gabel.
Prerequisite: Music 101 and others as appropriate to the topic

Music 261-269: Selected Studies in Music History and Literature

Courses taught under this title focus on an area of music history and literature.  Possible topics include the historical development and the repertoire of an era of “school” (e.g., the Baroque Era, French Music, Music in the United States, the History of Jazz). These courses typically investigate the masterworks and lives of the principal composers of the era as well as the social and musical concepts that influenced the period.  Classes typically involve lecture, discussion, student presentations, field trips, and live and videotaped performances as well as sound recordings.  Descriptions of current offerings are available through the department office and the Registrar’s Office.
Prerequisite: Music 101 or 102 and other courses as appropriate to the topic

271-279: Selected Studies in Musical Forms and Genres

Courses taught under this title focus on a particular musical form or genre. Possible topics include the historical development and literature of opera, the symphony, chamber music, vocal and choral music, music for keyboard instruments, etc. These courses typically investigate the masterworks in a genre, the lives and contributions of composers in several areas, and the social, technological, and musical factors that have affected the development of that genre. Classes typically involve lecture, discussion, student presentations, field trips, and live and videotaped performances as well as sound recordings. Descriptions of current offerings are available through the department office and the Registrar’s Office.
Prerequisite: Music 101 or 102 and other courses as appropriate to the topic

281-289: Selected STUDIES of Great Composers

Courses taught under this title focus on the music of an individual composer. Possible choices include Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Verdi, and Stravinsky, to name but a few. These courses typically investigate the masterworks in the important genres, the life and musical development of the individual studies, and the social factors that affected the time period in which he/she lived. Classes typically involve lecture, discussion, student presentations, field trips, and live and videotaped performances as well as sound recordings. Descriptions of current offerings are available through the department office and the Registrar’s Office.
Prerequisite: Music 101 or 102 and other courses as appropriate to the topic

323: Music Theory III

This course furthers the study of the “Common Practice Period” with chromatic language since the 18th century, with correlated sight-singing, ear training, and keyboard assignments. Concepts include diatonic seventh chords in 4-part harmony, borrowed chords and augmented-sixth chords, chromatic and enharmonic modulation, secondary sub-dominants and passing chords, jazz analysis and keyboard voicing, chromatic improvisation, and topics in form and analysis. Additional one-hour lab scheduled weekly.
Prerequisite: Music 222 or permission of instructor

324: Twentieth Century Harmonic Practice

This course continues the study of chromatic harmony of post-Romanticism and begins the study of 20th century idioms. Students will compose short works in 20th century styles for small ensemble settings.  Students will also analyze important works by Stravinsky, Bartok, Schoenberg, Copland, and others.
Prerequisite: Music 222 or permission of instructor

325: Composition Seminar

This course is designed for advanced and highly motivated music theory students interested in writing music for ensembles or individual instruments and voices. Students will compose works in genres largely of their own choosing and will organize and rehearse ensembles appropriate to their compositions, with musicians chosen primarily from the College community. Additionally, students will research various composers, examining a range of publications produced by the selected composers themselves.
Prerequisite: Music 324

351-360: Special Topics

The detailed study of a composer, school, specific style or topic, employing more advanced analytical tools. Topics in past years have included African-American Music; Mozart: The Man, the Myth, the Music; History of Jazz; and The Music of J. S. Bach. Topics for the following year are announced at spring registration. The typical classroom experiences are augmented by artist visits and field trips to suitable venues, for example, a jazz club or concert for the course on Jazz History.  Permission of instructor required.  Staff.

MUS 371, 372: Internship

Students majoring in music may wish to explore career opportunities by participating in an approved internship with a professional performing organization, arts management consultant, or related music industry representative. Under the supervision of a designated internship sponsor, the student develops and completes a work-related project. Additional activities include assigned readings and a final written report.
Prerequisite: Permission of department head

380: Junior/Senior Seminar

Advanced special-topic studies emphasizing research in greater depth of a selected musicological problem. Open only to junior and senior music majors and minors.
Prerequisite: Permission of department head

391, 392: Independent Study

Individual projects in musicology, theory, or composition, with emphasis on the bibliographic and analytical tools of music research or composition. Open to students with a strong background in music.
Prerequisite: Permission of department head

491, 492: Senior Project

Independent study of a selected problem in musicology, theory, or composition, with emphasis on the bibliographical and analytical tools of music research, resulting in the completion of a project such as a research paper or a series of original compositions. Open only to senior Music majors.
Prerequisite: Permission of department head

495, 496: Senior Project

Thesis/Honors independent study of a selected problem in musicology, theory, or composition, with emphasis on the bibliographical and analytical tools of music research, resulting in the completion of a project such as a research paper or a series of original compositions. Open only to senior Music majors. Upon completion of 496, the awarding of Departmental Honors is determined by successful defense of the thesis.
Prerequisite: Permission of department head